The OC Register – Mark Steyn: Your car can’t run on Congress’ hot air

I was watching the Big Oil execs testifying before Congress. That was my first mistake. If memory serves, there was lesbian mud wrestling over on Channel 137, and on the whole that’s less rigged. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz knew the routine: “I can’t say that there is evidence that you are manipulating the price, but I believe that you probably are. So prove to me that you are not.”

Had I been in the hapless oil man’s expensive shoes, I’d have answered, “Hey, you first. I can’t say that there is evidence that you’re sleeping with barnyard animals, but I believe that you probably are. So prove to me that you are not. Whatever happened to the presumption of innocence and prima facie evidence, lady? Do I have to file a U.N. complaint in Geneva that the House of Representatives is in breach of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights?”

But that’s why I don’t get asked to testify before Congress.

Ugh. They should all be thrown in jail for subverting our human rights.

[I]f the House of Representatives has now declared it “illegal” for the government of Saudi Arabia to restrict oil production, why is it still legal for the government of the United States to restrict oil production? In fact, the government of the United States restricts pretty much every form of energy production other than the bizarre fetish du jour of federally mandated ethanol production.

Nuclear energy?

Whoa, no, remember Three Mile Island? (OK, nobody does, but kids and anyone under late middle age, you can look it up in your grandparents’ school books.)

Coal?

Whoa, no, man, there go our carbon credits.

OK, how about if we all go back to the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe, and start criss-crossing the country on wood-fired trains?

Are you nuts? Think of the clear-cutting. We can’t have logging in environmentally sensitive areas such as forests.

Rep. Wasserman Schultz believes in “alternative energy,” which means not nuclear (like the French) but solar and wind power. At the moment, solar energy accounts for approximately 0.1 percent of U.S. electricity production, most of which is for devices that heat swimming pools. So if there was a tenfold increase in swimming pool construction you might be able to get it up to 1 percent, but the only way all those homeowners would be able to afford to build their new swimming pools is through the kinds of economic activity that depend on oil, gas and other forms of federally prohibited energy.

So, instead, Congress hauls Big Oil execs in for the dinner-theatre version of a Soviet show trial and then passes irrelevant poseur legislation like the NOPEC bill. The NOPEC bill is really the NO PECS bill – a waste of photocopier paper passed by what C.S. Lewis called “men without chests.”…

So we complain about $4-a-gallon gas, and our leaders respond with showboating legislation like NOPEC and feel-good environmental regulatory overkill like putting the polar bear on the endangered-species list, while ensuring that we’ll continue to bankroll every radical mosque and madrassah on the planet. In Britain, new “green taxes” do nothing to “save” the planet, but they are estimated to cost the average family about $6,000 a year. That’s change you can believe in.

Oy.

I feel like I’ve been “oying” a lot lately. And I don’t think it’s because of the election. I think there’s just more and more to “oy” about. And that’s without the “aughs” over the serious life-and-death stuff about Burma, China, Tibet, Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Russia, and all the rest of the stuff that nobody (and me) ever pays any attention to anymore. There’s all this Really Serious Stuff going on in the world and all we get is some idiot lady from Florida who somehow got a bunch of people to vote for her dragging a bunch of oily guys in suits to dance a kabuki with her over a bunch of damaging peripherals.