Two days ago I found myself holding my nose through a line at Starbucks (you might remember this article from many moons ago which completely turned me off to that little brand), plus the women driving protest last week, and now this (and note the language (“we’re not the only ones doing this so don’t pile up on us!”)), responding to the outrage about Delta’s new agreement with Saudi airlines that they won’t bring anyone Jewish, anyone with an Israeli stamp in their passport, or any item of religious significance to any religion other than Islam into the country (even for layovers):

Delta Air Lines does not discriminate nor do we condone discrimination against any of our customers in regards to age, race, nationality, religion, or gender.

Delta does not operate service to Saudi Arabia and does not codeshare with any airline that serves that country. Delta does not intend to codeshare or share reciprocal benefits, such as frequent flier benefits, with Saudi Arabian Airlines, which we have confirmed with SkyTeam, an Amsterdam-based 14-member global airline alliance.

Delta’s only agreement with Saudi Arabian Airlines is a standard industry interline agreement, which allows passengers to book tickets on multiple carriers, similar to the standard interline agreements American Airlines, US Airways and Alaska Airlines have with Saudi Arabian Airlines.

All of the three global airline alliances – Star, which includes United Airlines; oneworld, which includes American Airlines, and SkyTeam, which includes Delta – have members that fly to Saudi Arabia and are subject to that country’s rules governing entry.

Well, maybe they shouldn’t.